All posts in category Men’s Health-Erectile Dysfunction

SYPHILIS – CONGENITAL SYPHILIS

The early lesions are similar to those of secondary syphilis with rhinitis, rash, bone involvement, hepatosplenomegaly, meningitis and anaemia. Late congenital syphilis is comparable to late acquired syphilis. It usually occurs after 2 years of age. Manifestations include Hutchinson’s triad (interstitial keratitis, incisor defects and perceptive deafness), gummas and neurosyphilis. Cardiovascular lesions do not occur [...]

SYPHILIS – LATENT SYPHILIS; LATE SYPHILIS

Positive serology in a patient without symptoms or signs of disease is referred to as latent syphilis and is the commonest presentation of syphilis in Australia today. Possibly because of the widespread use of antibiotics, the infection often proceeds to the latent stage without a recognised primary or secondary stage. An attempt should be made [...]

SYPHILIS – SECONDARY SYPHILIS

Secondary syphilis is generally an immune complex disease presenting in various ways. In many cases symptoms are too mild to be of concern to the patient. The most common feature of the secondary stage of infection is a rash which is present in about 80% of cases. The rash is typically a symmetrical, generalised, coppery-red [...]

SYPHILIS – CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS

Primary syphilis The primary lesion or chancre usually develops at the point of inoculation after an incubation period averaging 21 days (ranging from 10 to 90 days). The chancre is typically firm, painless, punched out and clean. The adjacent lymph nodes are discretely enlarged, firm and non-suppurating. Anorectal chancres may occur in homosexual men. Untreated, [...]

SYPHILIS – DEFINITION

Syphilis is caused by Treponema pallidum, one of a group of closely related spirochaetes including Tpertenue,Tcarateum and Tpallidum var Bosnia which cause yaws, pinta and endemic syphilis respectively. In Australia, syphilis usually presents either as a primary lesion or through the chance finding of positive syphilis serology. Practitioners should be alert to the various manifestations [...]

CHLAMYDIA AND NON¬GONOCOCCAL URETHRITIS AND CERVICITIS – MANAGEMENT

For treatment failures and for patients for whom tetracyclines are contraindicated, erythromycin (e.g. erythromycin stearate or ethyl succinate 500 mg every 8 hours 1 hour before food for 10 days for simple infections and longer in complicated cases) may be used. In patients with persistent or recurrent urethral symptoms, repeated antibiotic prescriptions should not take [...]